Disabling Emojis In WordPress

Back in WordPress 4.2, they added emoji into WordPress – which I think is one of the loveliest things in the world ūüôā

Unfortunately, YSlow does not… those lovely little emoji take up some precious¬†HTTP requests – one of WordPress’ biggest challenges can be that it comes with so much overhead – which can slow down your load time quite a bit!

Thankfully, they’re super easy to remove:
Disable emojicons introduced with WP 4.2 

Between turning off the emoji and disabling Jetpack (sorry Jetpack!), my YSlow speed went up by almost 10% to an 81 ūüôā


To be fair to Jetpack, it is a pretty nifty plugin – I just wasn’t using it for anything on this site :p

Disabling Emojis In WordPress

Teaching Git Internals Better: Use Your GUI

Programming is unnecessarily unfriendly to newer programmers.  We can make it better through simple optimizations.  This is the Third of a Series of blog posts where I’ll be exploring that!


A lot of people teach Git Internals. ¬†It’s a great thing! ¬†It helps people understand Git and just how it works, and what all those commands do. ¬†However, there’s one frequent problem with their approach: They don’t use their Operating System’s GUI*.

The problem with this is that the command line is implicit. ¬†You have to¬†trust that it’s just doing its thing. ¬†Yes, at some point, every programmer needs to be proficient and comfortable with the command line, but it’s inaccessible and confusing to most newer programmers. ¬†This makes your presentation harder to absorb and learn from.

On the other hand, there’s something we all already know how to do: Double click our folder in our Window System and see what’s actually going on. ¬†There’s another thing we all know how to do: Open up a file with a text editor, and see what’s actually inside! Continue reading “Teaching Git Internals Better: Use Your GUI”

Teaching Git Internals Better: Use Your GUI

Making Your Open Source Project More Accessible To New And First-Time Contributors

Programming is unnecessarily unfriendly¬†to newer programmers. ¬†We can make¬†it better through simple optimizations. ¬†This is the Second of a Series of blog posts where I’ll be exploring that!


One of the most challenging and popular topics amongst newer (and especially self-taught programmers) is contributing to open source. ¬†The scope of making your first open source contribution can be extremely overwhelming – especially when so many open-source projects don’t make any significant efforts to be inclusive of new or first-time contributors.

Here’s a list of light-weight suggestions for your Readme.md and Contributing.md files that will¬†make your open-source project accessible to beginners, and build a stronger community around your project*. Continue reading “Making Your Open Source Project More Accessible To New And First-Time Contributors”

Making Your Open Source Project More Accessible To New And First-Time Contributors

Git & GitHub Resources

Git & GitHub are essential tools for almost any software developer. ¬†Here’s a list of what I’ve found to be the best resources for them:

Git:

GitHub:

Git & GitHub Resources

A List of Beginner-Friendly Open Source Projects

Last night, I presented at the¬†Women Who Code NYC “Open Source¬†Workshop“. ¬†It was very much a learning experience for me, and I hope to share more thoughts later. ¬†In the meantime, here’s a (work-in-progress) list of some beginner-friendly open source projects:

If you know of more, feel free to leave them in the comments, and I’ll add any that seem like a great fit!

A List of Beginner-Friendly Open Source Projects

Fixing Sublime Text 3’s CSS Comments

I’ve been doing a lot of web design work lately, and I’ve noticed that Sublime Text 3 has this really weird quirk with CSS¬†comments. ¬†When you press Ctrl+/ you get a strange your comment comes out like this /*This is a Comment*/ instead of like this /* This is a Comment */

Since it’s Sublime Text, I knew it had to be possible to reconfigure this. After asking a friend or two (special thanks to Kara McNair), and doing some digging, here’s the solution, using Package Control & Package Resource Viewer: Continue reading “Fixing Sublime Text 3’s CSS Comments”

Fixing Sublime Text 3’s CSS Comments

Organizing Chaos

I have an Addictive Personality: I love Reading, I love Learning & I love Interesting Discussions. ¬†I also love Problem Solving, Coding & Designing. ¬†Lately the first 3 have been getting in the way of the last 2 – this is a problem since I have projects, jobs & applications that need to get done. ¬†So I’m iterating on how to organize the chaos that is my mind.


Current Rules:

  1. No Facebook or Tumblr in the morning.  Read Medium instead.
  2. Tumblr & Facebook are blocked on StayFocusd.  Time Limit: 90 min.
  3. Use Facebook & Tumblr one-directionally whenever possible (Post – Don’t Read)
  4. Keep a maximum of 3 Sublime Text Projects open at any given time.
  5. Use Asana to account for the possibility of forgetting ideas/projects
  6. Daily Email Schedule РOnly check email during those times
  7. Filter & unsubscribe from all unnecessary & recurring emails
  8. Turned off Badge Notifications for Facebook & Email

Continue reading “Organizing Chaos”

Organizing Chaos